,
Message sent from:

History subject overview

‘’History is written by the victors’’  

[Winston Churchill]

Curriculum overview:

Our History curriculum at St.Paul’s includes half-termly topics for all children from Year 1 to Year 6.

We aim to offer a high-quality history education that will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ intellectual curiosity to know more about the past and make links with the present world.

 

In Key Stage One (Year 1 and Year 2), pupils are taught to develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They should use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.

In planning to ensure the progression described above through teaching about the people, events and changes outlined below, teachers are often introducing pupils to historical periods that they will study more fully at key stages 2 and 3.

Pupils are taught about:

-changes within living memory

-events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally

- the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements [for example, Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Christopher Columbus]

-significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.

In Key Stage Two, children are taught continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study. They should note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms. They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

In planning to ensure the progression described above through teaching the British, local and world history outlined below, teachers should combine overview and depth studies to help pupils understand both the long arc of development and the complexity of specific aspects of the content.

In Key Stage Two, pupils are taught about:

  • changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age
  • the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain
  • Britain’s settlements by the Anglo-Saxons
  • a local history study.
  • a non-European society that provided contrast with British history: Mayan civillisation c. AD 900. 

Intent statement for the subject of history

‘’History is written by the victors’’  

[Winston Churchill]

Intent:

 

Our History curriculum at St.Paul’s includes half-termly topics for all children from Year 1 to Year 6.

We aim to offer a high-quality history education that will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ intellectual curiosity to know more about the past and make links with the present world.

History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups. It also helps children gain a sense of their own identity within a social, political, cultural and economic background. Because of this, we feel it is important for the subject to be taught discreetly but also incorporated within other curriculum subjects such as English and Art.

During each session, teaching should engage all pupils of all abilities. Class teachers deliver high-quality history sessions so that children can develop the following skills:

- ask perceptive questions

- think critically

- weigh evidence

- sift arguments

- develop perspective and judgement.

 

 

 

Winston ChurchillFINEST HOUR SPEECH

Implementation

Implementation

 

All learning will start by revisiting prior knowledge and the so called ‘hook lesson’.

The first objective will be scaffolded to support children to recall previous learning and make connections. Staff will model explicitly the subject-specific vocabulary, knowledge and skills relevant to the learning to allow them to integrate new knowledge into larger concepts. All staff will support their children by using a range of visual resources, for instance knowledge organisers, timelines, pictorials. The consistent use of these resources supports children at St Paul’s  to retain new facts and vocabulary in their long term memory. Knowledge organisers are used for pre-teaching, to support home learning and also as a part of daily review.

Impact

 

At St Paul’s Catholic Primary, Pupil Voice, Learning Walks and regular monitoring show that pupils are confident and able to talk about what they have learnt in history using subject specific vocabulary. Pupil Voice also demonstrates that pupils enjoy history and are able to recall their learning over time. Pupils work demonstrates that history is taught at an age appropriate standard across each year group with opportunities planned in for pupils working at greater depth. Work is of good quality and demonstrates pupils are acquiring knowledge, skills and vocabulary in an appropriate sequence.

Black History MonthI HAVE A DREAM HISTORY LEAD
X
Hit enter to search